Australia Post chief executive accused of misusing corporate credit card for personal spending

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Inside the life of Australia Post chief executive who has spent thousands on a corporate credit card and has a chauffeur to drive her around

  • Australia Post boss Christine Holgate is accused of ‘living high on the hog’
  • She is accused of racking up thousands of dollars on corporate credit cards
  • Ms Holgate is a millionaire who is driven around in a chauffeur-driven car 

Australia Post boss Christine Holgate has been accused of racking up tens of thousands of dollars on her corporate credit card and being chauffeured around by a private car service.

The millionaire chief executive has come under scrutiny after she refused to hand over spending records to a federal Senate inquiry, claiming it would be ‘unreasonable diversion of resources’.

Ms Holgate spent $88,099 on her credit card from November 2017 to June this year while another $287,063  has been amassed in the last year on a card used by her office, the Herald Sun reported.

Some of the later amount was spent on a car service for Ms Holgate to travel between her home, office and meetings ‘often at early or late hours’. 

Christine Holgate (pictured) has spent $88,099 on her credit card since her appointment as Australia Post chief executive three years ago

Christine Holgate (pictured) has spent $88,099 on her credit card since her appointment as Australia Post chief executive three years ago

Other expenses included flowers, gifts, professional development and travel.

Ms Holgate and other Australia Post executives also spent almost $70,000 on functions, entertainment, gifts, a ‘bonding day’ and expenses between January and June this year, despite the coronavirus pandemic.

 Australia Post told the Senate it would be an ‘unreasonable diversion of resources’ to provide a breakdown of spending.

It’s also been revealed Australia Post recently spent almost $120,000 an external public relations firm Domestique to provide advice on issues.

Opposition government accountability spokeswoman and Senator for Victoria Kimberley Kitching described it as a ‘small fortune as she demanded the release of spending records.

‘Australia Post needs more communication and less crisis,’ she said.

‘Australians are reliant on Australia Post to deliver their mail and instead of concentrating on her day job to make sure this happens, Ms Holgate appears to be living high on the hog.’

Australia Post boss Christine Holgate (pictured) has been accused of 'living high on the hog' by the federal Opposition

Australia Post boss Christine Holgate (pictured) has been accused of 'living high on the hog' by the federal Opposition

Australia Post boss Christine Holgate (pictured) has been accused of ‘living high on the hog’ by the federal Opposition

 An Australia Post spokesman told the publication credit card spending was ‘regulated by a strict policy and subject to approvals’.

A spokeswoman told The Australian Domestique was no longer on a retainer but was still engaged to provide advice.

‘Domestique is currently engaged by Australia Post to provide communication planning and advice services, and issues management advice services,’ she said

‘It’s very common for organisations to engage corporate affairs advice and they represent some of Australia’s largest brands. They are not on an ongoing retainer.’

Ms Holgate became the first woman to be appointed in the top role when she joined Australia Post in 2017.

Earlier this year, Ms Holgate was revealed as Australia’s highest paid civil servant, earning more than $2.5 million in 2018-19.

Australia Post recently spent almost $120,000 for external public relations firm Domestique to provide advice on issues (stock image)

Australia Post recently spent almost $120,000 for external public relations firm Domestique to provide advice on issues (stock image)

Australia Post recently spent almost $120,000 for external public relations firm Domestique to provide advice on issues (stock image)



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