Fox meteorologist whose in-laws died of COVID-19 blasts Gov Cuomo for releasing book

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A Fox News meteorologist whose in-laws died of COVID-19 has blasted New York Gov Andrew Cuomo for releasing a book about the pandemic saying it has made her grief worse.

Cuomo’s book titled American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic was released on Tuesday.

Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean, whose elderly in-laws died from the virus, on Tuesday criticized the Democratic Gov over the timing of his book.

‘I don’t know any governor in the middle of a pandemic that should release a book, especially this one,’ Dean told Fox & Friends.

‘I have to tell you it just makes our grief worse to see him promoting a book like this and dodging the questions when he’s being asked.’

While Cuomo was praised by some in the early days of the pandemic for his calming briefings, he has also been criticized heavily for the high number of deaths at New York nursing homes.

Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean, whose elderly in-laws died from the virus, on Tuesday criticized the Democratic Gov over the timing of his book

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's book titled American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic was released on Tuesday

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's book titled American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic was released on Tuesday

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s book titled American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic was released on Tuesday. Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean, whose elderly in-laws died from the virus, on Tuesday criticized the Democratic Gov over the timing of his book

A recent AP investigation found that the state’s death toll of nursing home patients, already among the highest in the nation, could be significantly more than reported. Unlike every other state with major outbreaks, only New York explicitly says that it counts just residents who died on nursing home property and not those who were transported to hospitals and died there.

So far, Cuomo’s administration has declined to release the number. The governor has called criticism of nursing home deaths politically motivated.

Despite that criticism, his press briefings at the beginning of the pandemic earned him praise from some who suggested he was a calming voice amid lockdowns and widespread deaths from the virus.

Cuomo's book, American Crisis, was published today. It is marketed as lessons in leadership throughout the COVID-19 pandemic

Cuomo's book, American Crisis, was published today. It is marketed as lessons in leadership throughout the COVID-19 pandemic

Cuomo’s book, American Crisis, was published today. It is marketed as lessons in leadership throughout the COVID-19 pandemic

He also faced calls from some to run for president in 2024.

In his book, which covers Cuomo’s take on the COVID-19 pandemic, the Democrat denied a presidential bid.

He said he would run for re-election as governor but had no intention of running for president.

Cuomo also spoke of his family in the book, particularly his father: The late former fellow New York Gov. Mario Cuomo.

He revealed that on days when he is having a difficult day, he’ll wear his father’s shoes.

‘Since he died, when I have a special or difficult day, I wear my father’s shoes: literally!’ Cuomo wrote in his book.

‘It sounds ridiculous, I know. My father wasn’t a material person and we didn’t have many objects to remember him by after his death, but he loved shoes and I wear the same size as he did. My mother gave me my pick.

‘My daughters were particularly fascinated with the ‘filling your father’s shoes’ psychological angle, but I wanted them to know how important he was to me and how much comfort I still take in feeling that he is with me,’ he wrote. ‘I only hope that my daughters can get that sense of comfort from me when I’m gone. 

‘I am not sure my father would support everything I do in his shoes, but he would appreciate what they mean to me, and he would love that I still shine them the same way he taught me.’ 

Cuomo spoke of his family in the book, particularly his father: The late former fellow New York Gov. Mario Cuomo (above). He revealed that on days when he is having a difficult day, he'll wear his father's shoes

Cuomo spoke of his family in the book, particularly his father: The late former fellow New York Gov. Mario Cuomo (above). He revealed that on days when he is having a difficult day, he'll wear his father's shoes

Cuomo spoke of his family in the book, particularly his father: The late former fellow New York Gov. Mario Cuomo (above). He revealed that on days when he is having a difficult day, he’ll wear his father’s shoes

Hosts Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest, who repeatedly praised Cuomo's handling of the coronavirus crisis during the interview, asked at one point who was the favorite son. Early on in the pandemic, Cuomo and his brother Chris repeatedly sparred with each other over who was favored more by mom Matilda

Hosts Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest, who repeatedly praised Cuomo's handling of the coronavirus crisis during the interview, asked at one point who was the favorite son. Early on in the pandemic, Cuomo and his brother Chris repeatedly sparred with each other over who was favored more by mom Matilda

Hosts Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest, who repeatedly praised Cuomo’s handling of the coronavirus crisis during the interview, asked at one point who was the favorite son. Early on in the pandemic, Cuomo and his brother Chris repeatedly sparred with each other over who was favored more by mom Matilda

During an appearance on Live with Kelly and Ryan to promote the book, Cuomo spoke of his family again when he described his CNN brother Chris Cuomo as his ‘mini me’.    

In the wide-ranging interview, Cuomo joked that he was his mother’s favorite son, spoke of how widely watched his daily briefings were and said he has given New Yorkers ‘unbiased facts’ throughout the pandemic.  

Hosts Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest, who repeatedly praised Cuomo’s handling of the coronavirus crisis during the interview, asked at one point who was the favorite son.

Early on in the pandemic, Cuomo and his brother Chris repeatedly sparred with each other – either during the governor’s daily briefings or on the younger Cuomo’s CNN show – about who was the favored son. 

‘I was my mother’s favorite son before my brother was born. I was the first born, I was the first loved. He came along, I don’t begrudge him as a second son… You know, as a mini me, that’s fine. The first is the best,’ Cuomo said on Tuesday. 

His interview came as New York, the initial epicenter of the US outbreak, has experienced a spike in hospitalizations in the last few days.

There has also been an uptick in cases in New York state, which Gov Cuomo has blamed on cluster outbreaks in New York City.  

Cuomo announced on Monday that there were 878 New Yorkers hospitalized with the virus, which was an increase of almost 60 patients since the previous day.   

His interview came as New York, the initial epicenter of the US outbreak, has experienced a spike in hospitalizations in the last few days

His interview came as New York, the initial epicenter of the US outbreak, has experienced a spike in hospitalizations in the last few days

His interview came as New York, the initial epicenter of the US outbreak, has experienced a spike in hospitalizations in the last few days

There has also been an uptick in cases in New York state, which Gov Cuomo has blamed on cluster outbreaks in New York City

There has also been an uptick in cases in New York state, which Gov Cuomo has blamed on cluster outbreaks in New York City

There has also been an uptick in cases in New York state, which Gov Cuomo has blamed on cluster outbreaks in New York City

His press briefings at the beginning of the pandemic earned him praise from some who suggested he was a calming voice amid lockdowns and widespread deaths from the virus.

‘I don’t know that I was calm and cool, I was exhausted more than anything,’ Cuomo said when asked on Tuesday about the effect his briefings had. 

‘People wanted the facts… so they could protect themselves. I wanted to give them the facts, unbiased, forget the politics, here’s where we are, here’s what we have to do. 

‘People were locked up… I think the briefings gave them a sense of continuity and they knew what was going on one day at a time.’ 

Cuomo said that at one point there were 64 million people watching his briefings. 

‘I was telling the truth and telling people how I felt and being honest about my emotions because I wanted, that connection was important for me, and people would understand the information and they would do the right thing,’ he said. 

Over the past few months, Cuomo has been praised for his calm but forceful demeanor, while also being accused of waiting too long to close schools and other indoor facilities, and criticized for the high number of deaths at New York nursing homes. 

He had said back in July he was thinking of a book saying he wanted to document the ‘entire experience, because if we don’t learn from this then it will really compound the whole crisis that we’ve gone through.’  



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