Smashing Pumpkins Now Recording 33-Song Sequel to ‘Mellon Collie’

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Smashing Pumpkins visionary Billy Corgan is one immensely prolific songwriter. So a lot in order that the band has simply began the recording section of a 33-song new album that may function the sequel to the Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness double album in addition to the 2 installments of Machina.

So, sure, this forthcoming document is a joint sequel to what finally quantities to 3 current albums within the Pumpkins catalog. Corgan definitely is aware of methods to preserve issues fascinating, particularly after meting out 2019’s 20-track alt-pop synth-heavy album, Cyr, the band’s first on Sumerian Records.

The information was confirmed via the Smashing Pumpkins’ official social media profiles the place a blurry picture of a drum set was adorned with textual content atop the picture that reads, “Starting new SP album today, the 33 song sequel to MCIS and Machina. Songs are written, lyrics too…so now it’s just record-record-record.”

In the autumn of final yr, Corgan confirmed the 33-track sequel was in movement, stating the fabric was shaping as much as be “kind of a rock opera.”

Corgan later commented in early 2021 that an up to date model of Machina II/The Friends & Enemies of Modern Music, which was launched free of charge on the web in 2000, may doubtlessly see an update upward of 80 songs.

Of the pair of Machine albums and the forthcoming replace, Corgan defined, “It was written to be kind of like a musical, but because it was never finished, it was like shooting a movie that wasn’t fully edited right. Machina I was like one edit of the footage, and Machina II was some of the leftover footage – but there was even more stuff leftover. So, this was my attempt, 20 years later, to kind of finish the movie and in the process of trying to finish the movie, realizing the movie can never be finished because a lot of stuff wasn’t finished.”

Billy Corgan Shares Update on New Smashing Pumpkins Album

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