Spy chief’s subtle tribute to Australia’s brave troops as he rescues Kylie Moore-Gilbert from Iran

0 24

Spy boss’s ‘hidden’ tribute to under-fire Aussie troops: Intelligence chief wears jacket with a symbol EVERY soldier would recognise as he escorts academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert from her Iranian hellhole

  • The special forces have faced scrutiny since war crimes allegations last week 
  • Spy chief Nick Warner was filmed helping rescue academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert
  • He wore a jacket associated with the special forces in a possible show of support 
  • Dr Moore-Gilbert was freed in a prisoner swap deal after two years in Tehran jail 

Australia’s top spy wore a leather jacket associated with special operations soldiers when he rescued academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert from her hellish jail in Iran.

Nick Warner, the 70-year-old director general of the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, was captured on video escorting Dr Moore-Gilbert into a van on Wednesday night after negotiating her release in a prisoner swap deal in Tehran.

Instead of wearing a suit to secure the trade, Mr Warner donned a $1,500 leather jacket by Kill Kapture, a brand created by ex-SASR solider Mark Wales who did ten tours of duty including four in Afghanistan before starting his fashion business. 

Nick Warner (left) donned a $1,500 Kill Kapture jacket complete with three chevrons (circled) as he rescued Kylie Moore-Gilbert. Chevrons are used to display rank in the military

The jacket (pictured) features three chevrons on the neck and a tracking system in case it gets lost. It is marketed at former troops and other men of action

The jacket (pictured) features three chevrons on the neck and a tracking system in case it gets lost. It is marketed at former troops and other men of action

The jacket (pictured) features three chevrons on the neck and a tracking system in case it gets lost. It is marketed at former troops and other men of action

The brand is closely identified with special operations forces whose missions often require them to kill or capture target enemies. 

The jacket, which features three chevrons on the neck and a tracking system in case it gets lost, is marketed at former troops and other men of action. 

Mr Warner’s decision to wear the garment could be interpreted as a show of support for Australia’s brave and law-abiding servicemen as the force is rocked by allegations of war crimes. 

Australia’s special forces have faced scrutiny after a four-year ADF inquiry last week reported evidence of 39 murders of civilians or prisoners by 25 Aussies serving in Afghanistan from 2009 to 2016. 

The Chief of the Army on Friday revealed that 13 members face the sack after being handed administrative action notices proposing to terminate their employment.  

Mr Warner (left) is pictured escorting Dr Moore-Gilbert into a van after she was released from custody in Tehran

Mr Warner (left) is pictured escorting Dr Moore-Gilbert into a van after she was released from custody in Tehran

Mr Warner (left) is pictured escorting Dr Moore-Gilbert into a van after she was released from custody in Tehran

The Kill Kapture jacket is designed by ex-SASR solider Mark Wales (pictured in the jacket) who did ten tours of duty including four in Afghanistan before starting his fashion business

The Kill Kapture jacket is designed by ex-SASR solider Mark Wales (pictured in the jacket) who did ten tours of duty including four in Afghanistan before starting his fashion business

The Kill Kapture jacket is designed by ex-SASR solider Mark Wales (pictured in the jacket) who did ten tours of duty including four in Afghanistan before starting his fashion business

Dr Moore-Gilbert, an Islamic studies lecturer with British and Australian citizenship, was arrested at Tehran Airport in September 2018. She was charged with espionage and jailed for 10 years after a secret trial.

The Australian government rejected her conviction and negotiated her release in exchange for three Iranian terrorists who were jailed in Thailand. 

When Dr Moore-Gilbert was released after surviving 804 days in Iran’s worst prisons, she thanked the Australian government for ‘working tirelessly’ to secure her freedom. 

Mr Warner, who was Australia’s ambassador to Iran from 1994 to 1997, was said to have played a pivotal role in the negotiations, using his diplomatic contacts.  

The 70-year-old, who will retire in December, caused a stir in 2017 when he famously posed with Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte while copying the strongman’s signature move of a raised fist.

It is not suggested that Mr Warner in any way supports or condones the alleged carrying out of war crimes by members of the SASR, only that he may be supportive of the SASR as an institution. 

Mr Warner is pictured with Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte in 2017. He will retire in December

Mr Warner is pictured with Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte in 2017. He will retire in December

Mr Warner is pictured with Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte in 2017. He will retire in December

Source link

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More